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Bennington, Vermont

Cruising around the Vermont countryside, in-between millions of signs advertising maple syrup, I just happen to come across yet another battlefield. And guess what – it’s commemorating a battle that the Americans won. Who would have guessed that??? I can’t remember the exact details of what went on, but it was another ‘heroic’ effort by some pitchfork-wielding farmers defeating the mighty Redcoats, blah blah, turning point in the war, blah blah. It wasn’t as good as Saratoga and there weren’t any people there milling around in 18th century costumes to chat to, but that didn’t stop there being another monument in the centre of town to take a look at. This one was a monster, and is apparently the tallest structure in Vermont. With a moose outside it, naturally. You buy a ticket and some old chap takes you up to the top, in a similar way to Gollum rowing his boat across the lake in ‘The Hobbit’, then you get a lovely view of Vermont, New York State and Massachusetts, or you would get a lovely view if the rain wasn’t lashing it down and you could barely see your hand in front of your face!
Warwick's Roadtrip Photo Vermont
Also in Bennington is a ‘famous’ museum. I thought it was going to be packed with Revolutionary War stuff, mock battles, etc., but most of the museum was dedicated to some old furniture, a few old pots, and some old biddy called Grandma Moses. She was a woman who lived in the area until she died at 101 years old, and produced a bunch of paintings. Apparently children loved these paintings, possibly because they reminded the kids of what they had painted during their first day in kindergarten: they really weren’t particularly good. So next time I see a museum advertised as ‘famous’, I will double check to make sure that they don’t mean ‘dull’.

Warwick's Roadtrip Photo Vermont

Outside the museum was the obligatory moose, along with a sign telling you that the Bennington Moosefest was taking part. It didn’t have any other details as to what is involved in a ‘Moosefest’ so I’m still blissfully ignorant, which is probably the best way to be. Also outside the museum was also a rather disturbing statue of a man in a hat, possibly Abraham Lincoln but possibly not, and two small children. The young girl was at his feet gazing adoringly at his bits, while the young boy was standing up while Abe had his hand on the child’s head and appeared to be pushing it towards his bits in the manner of a Catholic priest. Or maybe it simply symbolises the innocence of youth and I’m just a dirty old man!

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